Certificate Program // Under Construction // Pilot Courses

Main Goal: Build a Shared Framework for Collaboration Among Policy Makers and Artists
Culture is an opportunity for policymakers. It has often been overlooked as a platform for development. The word has two irreconcilable meanings (See Raymond Williams, Keywords): 1: a stable or evolving social scientific meaning of shared legacy. In this sense, cultures bond communities and caution policymakers to respect existing practices. 2: an intentionally dynamic humanist and artistic meaning that interrupts existing practices and creates novel ways to both bridge diverse communities and to fuel development by stimulating imagination and reflection. We feature this second meaning, less familiar to policymakers who are often trained in social sciences rather than in arts and humanities.
What:
The arts are vehicles for realizing policy goals. Arts have been appreciated as diversion and leisure activities, but they are also powerful tools to engage and to develop human and social capital. As vehicles for policy making, the arts are not a luxury fringe but among the useful tools to achieve sustainable development.
The arts can complement the tools of more traditional policymaking that often relies on rewards and punishments, using monetary and/or regulatory tools. We refer to the set of rewards and punishment as an incentive structure. Incentives are placed in a policy framework that describe expected cause-effect relationships, define precise indicators to monitor and evaluate implementation, perform a risk assessment of the initiative, among other things.
Monitoring and evaluation techniques, now standards in mainstream policy making, can increase the effectiveness of the arts to address societal challenges. Evaluation can advance us from recognizing anecdotal evidence to generating principles of development through the arts.
Why:
The arts make change by e stimulating feelings and reflection to think out of the box. They arouse curiosity and stimulate more creativity and reflection to identify societal challenges and to create potential solutions.
Participatory arts are relatively low-cost and potentially high impact practices that train people in particular skills, collaboration, and raise self-esteem along with pride of place.
Participatory arts catalyze people's engagement in advancing the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
Engaging in the arts takes time and concentration, which occupies people in ways that prevent violence, often triggered by feelings of exclusion and boredom.
The arts generate equity across genders, racial, and socio-economic lines because the art values diverse uses of materials, resources, and approaches. No one response in art excludes other possibilities.
Current planning, monitoring, and evaluation tools in standard policymaking can increase the impact of the arts for social change.
How:
The arts make change:
Engage in systematic dialogue among policymakers and artists can be a powerful tool to co-create interventions for social change.
Promote competitive grants for specific problem solving proposals. Artists pitch ideas in an outsourcing dynamic. Policy-makers and their teams evaluate the proposals and dare to pilot winners.
Participatory arts are relatively low-cost and potentially high impact practices
Test regularly the impact of small grants to solve relatively big societal challenges using community-based arts.
Make existing public infrastructure and institutions available to participatory arts to increase the returns of public investments by developing collective pride of place.
Participatory arts catalyze people's engagement in advancing the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Use the transversal nature of art to foster collaborations among teams that address the complexity of any one of the 17 SDGs in particular regions and communities.
Take advantage of the arts as fuel for innovation and synergies in addressing the SDGs.
Engaging in the arts takes time and concentration, which occupies people in ways that prevent violence, often triggered by feelings of exclusion and boredom.
Prevent violence by occupying disaffected populations in time-consuming and satisfying collective arts projects
Reduce dropout rates from school by using educational projects that challenge students to make art that interprets required reading material.
The arts generate equity across genders, racial, and socio-economic lines.
Promote festivals and performances of various ethnic cultures that circulate through diverse cities in order to develop admiration, appreciation and integration.
Develop community arts leadership among diverse gender and ethnic identities.
Current planning, monitoring, and evaluation tools in standard policymaking can increase the impact of the arts for social change.
The Logical Framework Approach and similar ones can improve effectiveness in initiatives of arts for development.
The importance of evidence-based policymaking and common evaluation techniques.